8 Impactful ways to create your event stage design!

 Setting up a stage for speakers and presenters may seem like a simple matter compared to creating an elaborate performance platform.

But the success of a presentation—and of the people delivering their messages—depends on minute details like size, lighting, and accessibility, as well as the right selection of microphones and lecterns.

We list down 8 ways you can make sure you get it right and create a maximum impact on driving home the objective out of doing the event.

Choose the correct height.
Consider guests line of sight and comfort when choosing the right elevation for your stage.

For any presentation, 1.5 ft off the ground is considered ideal for seated audiences of up to 200.What you need to consider while doing so, however, is the total clear height you have available at the venue.

The height for the stage would need to increase depending on the size of the audience and can go up to 5 feet.

Use appropriate lighting.

Lighting should be properly situated for all of the individuals who will be standing on the stage at various heights.

Though it may seem surprising, stage lighting is often the most forgotten element and is also the most important not only during the event but also for the photos and videography done.

What we recommend is to black out the entire room and control the lighting from the console to have effective brightness as required. Never use only one profile light for the speaker, there are many speakers who like to move around and a minimum of 2 lights are required besides the general house lighting.

Make sure audio is loud and clear.Sound Rentals by Pegasus Events

In addition to lighting, quality sound also contributes to the effective communication of target messages and to an overall positive audience experience.

The most important thing is ensuring there is no feedback and there is an effective sound distribution across the venue. If you were to imagine your conference venue to be a square, it is essential to place at least one speaker in each corner of the venue.

Depending on the size of the audience, ensure all areas are covered by placing speakers at regular intervals. For a 200 capacity event, 4 speakers are required and you can increase the number of speakers by 2 for every 200 pax extra.

While a PA system is sufficient for a formal conference, you must have mid’s and bass speakers for any entertainment you might have. The effect of bass can be limited and your event agency can create effective combinations basis the type of entertainment you have at the event.

Select microphones based on speakers.

Always check with your speakers as to how they prefer to present. You will find presenters who like being stationary at the lectern while you will also find presenters who like to move around on stage. Many presenters use hand movements for effective communication as well.

The best thing to do is prepare for all contingencies. Have lectern mics, lapel mics as well as cordless mics for audiences to ask questions clearly. Ensure that post every presentation your event crew is standing by waiting to pass the mics to whoever requires it.

Always Brand the Lectern.
A lectern may seem like the most basic and ordinary of staging needs for presentations, but branding the lectern is important as all hotels and venues have different lecterns and unfortunately, the lectern can be an eyesore in the middle of the stage if it is not branded.

The branding should not have too much information, just the company logo with the central color theme for the overall stage should work.

Keep it simple.

“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication!” – Leonardo Da Vinci
Elaborate stage decor or sets may pose a distraction for speakers, as well as audience members—those watching live or those watching virtually or at a later time.

We recommend a clean and crisp end to end set-up which is elegant in itself and adds the grandeur required.

Allow easy access.
A stage with insufficient or complicated access can pose a threat to a successful event.

It is always advisable to have multi-layered panelling for ease of access, the speakers may as well enter from the front or the sides, but in the case of entertainment and any props which need to be rolled out onto the stage, they need to enter from behind the stage.

Remember: Size matters.

You always should have your agenda and speakers decided well before you plan for the stage and design.

Absolutely everything at your event needs to work like clockwork, in complete balance and needs to compliment each other, only then can you create an extremely impactful event.

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4 People you meet at a Corporate Event.

4 People you meet at a Corporate Event.

Events in a business to business marketplace are the tool most clients use to drive growth in Business.

To ensure the smooth functioning of the event and to make sure objectives are met, it is very important for Event managers to segregate the attending audience category-wise.

Based on our past experience organizing events, this minute detailing can do wonders to the overall show running and it helps in identifying what resources one needs to deploy so that the client can concentrate fully on interaction with Guests.

We  have been doing this for a while and believe that the people at the event make the event and have developed these 4 character sketches which are our bible for the events we do.

  1. The Client : While reading this you might think, geez what a surprise BUT although obvious it is critical to give the client a dedicated runner who is to be with the client at all times, so that any urgent requirement the client may have is addressed in a timely fashion and extremely promptly. It is also as important for the entire event crew manning different stations to identify which persons at the event represent the client company, so that if needed, they can approach the representative closest to them and action the crisis accordingly.
  2. The Guests : Again, stating the obvious. But a person to man the registration desk with the hostesses is essential in segregating the Guests from someone playing a more participatory role within the event. It also helps in providing the attending guests with a delightful and smooth experience where they are immediately identified, the registration process is completed and are escorted to their seats by the hostesses.
  3. The VIP : Besides the client, there has to at all times be one resource stationed near where the VIP’s are seated and the VIP’s need to be told about that person. This just allows to eliminate the possibility of the VIP requiring something and it not being readily available.
  4. The Speakers : One person who has a clear comm and is in direct communication with the console manager is in charge of this set of audiences. This person ensures the speakers are identified, Dry-Run done, Presentations loaded at the console and that the speakers are intimated about going up on stage at least 15 minutes before.

The above practice has been a big help for us  to help our clients meet their objectives and when put in practice it tends to elevate the level of service provided by a notch.

It has always been our motto to help ” Drive Business Growth through Tangible Event Experiences ” and this small step helps us achieve that very effectively.

5 Annoying Things People Do At Events

5 Annoying Things People Do At Events

Some arrive late. Some RSVP after the event is almost over. Some do not follow the pre-event info circulated by you and ask questions that are already answered.

It’s safe to say that, as event planners, we’ve seen our share of pet peeves that attendees indulge in, at events. Here’s a list of what really grinds our gears:

1. Not Adhering to Timelines:

It’s just plain rude and inconsiderate for an event guest to show up late. These are the people you see making their way in through the crowd awkwardly and excusing themselves. There are also a few who decide selectively to attend only one segment of the entire event and rush to the eating area as soon as their ‘favorite part’ is done. The worst of this kind are the no-shows who RSVP ‘yes’ but decide against it at the last minute.

2. Constant Phone Calls:

Not only do they keep their phones on loud, but also find it extremely okay to attend each and every call that they receive. It’s a blessing if they move out of the scene to chat, or you will be privy to some personal conversations on loud mode.

3. Coming to the Console for Requests:

The console is NOT a cellphone charging station. Some clients also get on the wrong side of the console (pun intended) by changing the agenda or order of presentations, leaving event planners baffled.

4. Leaving  Belongings at Registration:

Just because lanyards with your names are handed out at registration when you enter, it’s not okay to leave behind your belongings and ask event staff to keep an eye on them while you network/eat/take a washroom break and so on.

5. Irresponsible Drinking:

Everybody loves an open bar, but it’s great if event guests can keep themselves at an average pace and save some embarrassing moments for themselves and the others around.

These are a few less than impressive experiences that make event planners pull their hair out. Avoid these and you’ll be a regular invitee who’ll be remembered for the right reasons.

 

The Importance of Distributing a Pre-Event Memo

The Importance of Distributing a Pre-Event Memo

Planning an event for your brand can be a daunting task, something that requires a lot of concentration. There are many last minute challenges that need to be met. Clear communication, and collaboration between the event manager and the client can help overcome this . The best way is to develop and distribute a Pre-Event Memo.

While managing events, details with regard to the event requirements and the client’s objectives should always be first on your minds. However, most times, there is a certain level of disconnect between your own team and the people the client assigns from his team to work on the event. This is the main reason that a Pre-Event Memo absolutely needs to be a part of event plans.

This memo carries all the detailed information pertaining to the general functionality and logistics involved in planning an event. This would act as a ready reckon-er for all the information everyone (working on the event) would need, with specific responsibilities assigned to each person, and all other relevant information regarding the event flow.

Some straightforward, yet most necessary details are covered within this memo, are –

1) Event date, time and location.

2) Key phone numbers and email addresses

3) Venue floor-plan

4) Equipment element list

5) Drawing of setup floor-plan with sketch-up images displaying exact placement of stage.

6) List of panels (along with sizes), for company branding at the event

7) Information on speakers and general event flow.

8) List of responsibilities given to each individual working on the event.

9) List of Invitees

10) Timings of conducting dry-runs.

The aim of this Memo is to provide everyone involved, with a hands-on knowledge of virtually ANYTHING pertaining to the event. It is important, however, that this memo be distributed at least a week before the event, to allow suggestions and minor changes to take place without any hiccups.

This allows for a healthy client-event manager interaction, and helps build confidence among the people associated with the event; it encourages management authority to make last minute changes to the event flow (if required) without hesitation.

In conclusion, there is much emphasis riding on an event as a catalyst that represents a brand, and enhances the brand’s image. There is always a desire to employ every tool available to make the event a remarkable and memorable one, and the pre-event memo helps to achieve this in a highly professional and sophisticated way. It inspires all involved, and paves the way for events to be conducted with the highest standards of quality and organization.