What’s in a venue anyway?

 When planning an event, getting the venue correct is one of the most critical things which helps you attract your audience and create maximum impact out of doing the event.

Out of all the events which take place within the corporate spectrum, cocktail receptions and networking meets are the most frequent, with almost every company calling in their clients to spend some quality time outside the office, without having little or no formal agenda to the evening and creating meaningful relationships which help further client retention. Based on Pareto’s law, many companies use this as a tool to strengthen ties with current clients as well as to impress upon existing clients.

With so many companies organizing cocktail and networking meets, budgets assigned usually are controlled and at the same time, clients want to offer their guests the absolute best in food and drink.

While we think, hotel banquets especially 5-star ones are yet unmatched in terms of service quality and we from experience can say that a 5 Star name alone creates an impact, the past few years have seen the emergence of nightclubs as a new breed of places as an alternative to 5 –Star hotels which serve as corporate cocktail venues.

Based on past experiences we create a list of what you as a client need to know while you try to decide on a venue for you next company event/ Party:

5 Star Hotels

The charm and the charisma which 5-star hotels add to your event is exemplary. The ambiance created is usually the best, the brand of the hotel rings a bell with most attendees and attracts a great response from your invitees.

However, as they also say, “Quality comes at a price”

With the hotel usually, you would start with a dinner package with alcohol being as per consumption.

For the Set-up, you would require to include a charge for venue rentals within your budget, as giving you the venue for most of the day means a revenue loss for the hotel, which in business terms would not make sense.

The hotel would give you the banquet hall and extremely brilliant and hospitable service, but that means everything from your stage, sound, lights and AV is yet to be accounted for.

All licenses including liquor have to be accounted for additionally.

This is the best part however, 5 Star Hotels are available to be rented out on any of the days of the week including Fridays and Saturdays.

They can be approached for any kind of event you plan to have, and are not limited to any particular kind.

 Night Clubs and Lounges

Nightclubs and lounges are built for cocktail receptions and parties. The ambiance provides for candid conversations and an informal setting.

These venues usually offer you a per person package which includes Alcohol service and dinner at one flat fee for unlimited service. This fee usually is as much or a little more than what a 5 Star would offer you just for dinner.

Most Nightclubs and Lounges open for dinner and are non-functional during the day, which allows using the venue for Set-Up at no added cost. However, setting up a stage in case you want to have entertainment can be a challenge due to space constraints.

Along with the venue itself, most night clubs usually have a sound system and ambient lighting for a cocktail reception built in, and they usually include that within the package cost per person. This means you as a client do not have to shell out the extra bucks for Sound and Lights and can either save them or spend them on Corporate Gifting or Décor.

Many of these venues acquire event licenses on a yearly basis, hence they do not usually ask clients to acquire a license for a DJ or Live Entertainment. This, however, is subject to government regulations and all mandatory licenses need to be in place before the event takes place.

The disadvantage faced with Night Clubs and Lounges is, they usually never give out the venue exclusively on a Friday or Saturday, unless you do a complete buy-out. In that case, the cost usually goes higher than expected.

You cannot have banquet seating like you would at a hotel or banquet, you usually need to have floating crowd at the venue.

The kind of events you can do at these venues are limited to just cocktail receptions and company parties.

Besides the above-mentioned venues, an event is possible to conduct anywhere you would like, including your own facility as well.

The above information is solely based on our experiences as event planners, we have managed various events at both type of venues for our clients in the past and from what we have noticed, an event is only as good as the client makes it, you know your audience best and we hope the above information can help you make an informed choice the next time you look to organize a cocktail reception or party for your company.

Advertisements

Social Event Manager v/s Corporate Event Manager

Social Event Manager v/s Corporate Event Manager

While selecting an event manager to manage a particular event for you, it’s critical to define the type of event it is and accordingly choose the right person for the job. Many misconceive the term event manager to mean a person who can put together an event, irrespective of the scale or the type of the event. Seldom do people consider the small but significant differences which exist between a corporate event manager and a social event manager. These key differences can be highlighted very subtly yet identifying these differences while making a decision can be a make or break factor for an event.

A corporate event manager typically manages conferences, seminars, brand launches, activations and interactions with corporate houses and companies. They have a mission, vision and sales targets, so the direction to be worked in would be how you optimally capitalize your investment and accordingly get a return on the same through targeted activities which help deliver the company’s message to the end consumers.

A social event manager on the other hand manages weddings, anniversaries, birthdays etc. and would interact with individuals who have a vision of the perfect wedding, anniversary or birthday which they have been dreaming of for days, months or maybe even years.

And that is where the key difference lies, the emotional attachment which people have to a social event makes managing these kind of events a daunting yet exhilarating experience. A social event manager has an innate ability to connect with the individual more than the event, understand their client’s thoughts, perceptions and accordingly provide a service which exceeds expectations. The key to success for a social event manager is to have an ability to not only understand what has been said, but more importantly identify what has not been said. With a corporate event on the other hand, everything right from conceptualization to execution is centered around highlighting the needs of the audience attending the event and accordingly position ones product or service to maximize return on investment, so the direction that is worked towards is to make the company event a success and individual emotions rarely affect the course of the event as a whole.

Most social events are paid for by the individuals or families themselves, unlike corporate events that are funded by corporate budgets. This places constraints on how these costs are managed right upfront. Weddings, for example, can be funded by a collection of sources including personal funds, loans and gifts. This makes managing the budget a critical part of a successful event – sometime there is little or no room for tolerance for budget overruns or last minute expenses that were not accounted for in the planning, and can cause frustration for all parties involved.

The final and perhaps the most important difference is that most social events (weddings, birthdays and anniversaries in particular) are once-in-a-lifetime events. A corporate event provides opportunities for constant improvement and a platform to build a brand of events in itself which happen year after year.

From the differences highlighted above, social event management and corporate event management are two fundamentally different sections of the event management spectrum and the thought process which a corporate event manager follows is not possible to implement within a social event and vice versa.