Tag Archives: event production

3 Things we relate to from The Pawn Stars

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The Pawn Stars is a reality TV Show about a family run gold and silver Pawn store in Las Vegas, Nevada. The show is centered around the Harrison family, who own the store and how they go about running the business successfully on a day to day basis.

While most part of the show concentrates on American History and everything American , right from Antiques to Guns and rings, there are 3 aspects which we can think of, which can be considered relatable to most businesses and can make you take a step back and think whether you have faced those situations before.

  • No Fear 

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In today’s day and age, businesses are the toughest negotiators while closing a deal. A lot of this is contributed by the amount of existent competition within your industry ,making it harder to get the client to buy at the price you are quoting and one invariably drops their price just to close the sale.

What you notice in Pawn stars, if you have watched the show, is that they never fear the loss of the deal. They have a maximum bid which they offer, beyond which they refuse to go. What they very subtly bring to the fore is one of the oldest principles every sales person learns of, NEVER FEAR THE LOSS OF SALE.

We at Pegasus, try to incorporate this principle always, not because we are rigid and we cant negotiate, it would be stupid to not leave room for negotiation, but we set a ceiling for ourselves, we never drop below a certain standard of quality we set, the standard that clients reap maximum reward out of, even if the client asks us to. Which is when we say NO.

As they always say, “ Quality comes at a price”.

  • Knowing your Buyer/Seller as much as your product/service

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It is obvious, all sales people usually have all the knowledge about their product, the usual mantra being we are the best and we top all rankings etc etc. Many a times, they have little or no idea about how the industry of the person they are meeting operates. This can be a tremendous disadvantage to the seller, because that does not allow them to link their product to the need of the client, which just ends up making it a one sided pitch.

Any product which comes to the shop in Pawn Stars, the owners seem to have enough knowledge about it to negotiate backed by logic, which more often than not allows them to close the deal and maximise their margins.

We have always said, no two events for us are the same. Once we receive the initial brief about the event, we spend as much time on researching what industry the client is from in order to suggest options which would allow the client to derive maximum benefit from the event.

Every event has its constants and variables, we treat even the constants as variable until we are absolutely sure that the event would require it.

  • Always trust the experts :

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Many a times it so happens, in the eagerness to close the deal, people tend to over promise and under deliver. This happens because they tend to commit to things without knowing and understanding what goes into making those things happen.

On the show, they make it evident. Even if they have the slightest doubt, they have a panel of experts they consult for more information. And then, they trust that information completely.

In incorporating that within our business, our expert being our better sense of judgement, we have crafted ourselves the reputation of only taking on what we are sure of delivering and being absolutely vocal about something we are not sure of. The slightest doubt, makes us create contingencies, making delivering on our promises a certainty with all our clients.

5 ways how you can contribute towards making your event successful!

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As a client, you have expectations. You want to organize a fantastic event for your clients in a cost effective manner, and generate maximum return on investment out of doing so.

You want to be on top of your game, and you want to create a long lasting impression which your audience will remember until the next event you organize.

You want them to expect better and more when they attend your company’s next event.

You have 2 options here :

  • Try to become an event manager and be the jack of all trades, where you try to do everything and end up giving little attention to what will actually give you a return on your investment.

OR

  • You hand over the event execution to companies such as our’s, who do this everyday, so that you can concentrate on furthering relations with your attendees and ensuring your guests feel welcome out of attending the event.

Our guess and our hope is, that you want to be number 2. Unfortunately, from our experience, it is close to impossible for you as a client to completely let go, which is absolutely normal for any person.

Before you get into a conundrum and start wondering, how then will you manage both ,Read further for how you can help to ensure a smooth flowing event and at the same time have enough time to concentrate on your business.

  • Trust your event planner :

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This we list down first, because it is that critical to ensure a successful event. We always encourage our clients to be absolutely transparent and candid about what they expect. If you were to hold back any information related to the work we do, it can have adverse effects on the over all functioning of the event.

Your event is important to us, as it is to you and us seeing it from your perspective is extremely important to ensure flawless execution.

  • Be the single point of Contact :

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With most companies, more often than not, more than one person is assigned the responsibility of seeing the event through.

What is most recommended by us, is for us to have one point of contact in order to ensure one clear channel of communication and to avoid miscommunication.

This practice gives your event an organized approval structure and makes all event processes quicker and more efficient.

  • Follow Timelines :

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This is one of the most important aspects. Almost all event companies will give you a sheet, which will list down when specific things such as Podium presentations, attendee lists, approvals on event graphics and agenda are required latest by.

The reason for this is obviously to back up on all the finer details involved within the event. The event only gets as good as what the presenters and audience make it, Hence always meet those deadlines.

  • Hierarchy:

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This is a subtle reference to point no 2. While we expect a single point of contact at the clients company, it is critical, especially during the event that only the event planner who you have been dealing with be handed out instructions.

On the day of the event, you will see many event staff doing many different things, all directed by one person. If you were to hand them a set of instructions apart from what they are doing it would upset the wagon wheel completely, breaking a sprocket in the entire event machinery. Always ask the event director on site to assign someone for something you require.

To give you an example : If 2 hosts are assigned the responsibility of registration, and you ask them to escort a VVIP to their seat, they may do so, but that makes you vulnerable to losing the visiting cards collected at the registration desk and also leaves your registration desk unattended.

  • On the day, leave it to the experts:

This pretty much, is a compilation of all the above points put together. The reason to mention this though, is because most clients don’t realize that this is what your event planner prepared for since they first received the brief.

What we encourage our clients to do is, after the dry run is completed to leave the console and logistics in our capable hands and you enjoy the event, with your point of concentration being your attendees and speakers.

6 Steps for Planning an Out of Town Event

This article is borrowed from Endless Entertainment, written by Matt Walker. 

It is not uncommon for event planners to get into a routine – planning similar events at the same couple of venues while using the same vendors and the same staff. We can’t always plan events in our shell, in a location we know like the back of our hand, with people we’ve known for forever. Sometimes we have to break out of our shell and plan an event in a brand new location with different people, different vendors, and different conditions. The trick is knowing how to use this to your advantage. Let’s take a look at a few tips to help with planning an out of town event:

1. Research and Learn About Your Venue Options

Without a background of living or working in the area where the event will take place, there’s a good chance that you will know little to nothing about the venues available in the area. Since knowledge about your venue is integral in the planning process for an event, utilize all of the resources you have to get a good idea of what each venue can offer to your event. Research venue information online, find photos of the venue layout and setups for previous events, reach out to any contacts you know in the area to ask any questions you may have, call the venues with capacity, layout, and pricing questions, and more.

2. Choose a Venue

Your choice of venue will affect every aspect of planning and executing the event, so be sure that you are utilizing as much information when making the choice as possible. Another factor that may come into play is whether the venue is indoor, outdoor, or a combination of the two. Since the event will be out of town, you might have to deal with different weather conditions than you’re used to dealing with. Be sure to check out weather predictions if your venue is outside or has an outdoor portion (deck, yard, etc.). Once you solidify your choice and lock down the date for your venue, you can begin with the rest of the planning process.

3. Decide If You’ll Use Local or Out of Town Vendors

If you’ve been planning events in your local area, chances are that you have a set of local vendors that you usually use. A choice that you will have to make when planning an out of town event is whether to use your usual, trusted vendors and transport the rented equipment or to use a different vendor in the location of the event. There are variables with both options. If you use your usual vendors, you will likely have higher expenses to transport equipment and you will have to be sure to keep equipment from being broken or scratched during travel, but you know the type of service and equipment you will be receiving. If you use an out of town vendor, you will not have to worry about transportation issues, but will likely be working with people you have never worked with before. This is a decision that needs to be made on an individual event basis depending on budget and how you feel about using a new vendor after reaching out to them.

4. Coordinate Travel and Lodging for Employees

Chances are that you will be using at least some in-house personnel at the event even if it is out of town. Depending on how far away the event is and how long the event will take, you will need to coordinate their travel and lodging. If they need to fly to the destination, flights will need to be booked well in advance to keep expenses down. If they can travel by car, carpools need to be coordinated and the process of how gas will be reimbursed needs to be laid out beforehand. When booking hotel rooms, be sure that you are holding the correct number of rooms with plenty of time in advance. Since they are staying in a hotel for an event, chances are there will be other people doing the same, and you don’t want to end up in a situation where there are no hotel rooms left to book! Deciding whether or not employees will be sharing rooms beforehand and, if they are, choosing who each person will be rooming with can help prevent a headache later on.

5. Include Extra Travel Time

Since employees are traveling to a place they probably haven’t been before, be sure to include a little extra time for travel in your itinerary. Since they are going somewhere new, there is a better chance that a wrong turn may be made, that they will have to go out of their way to find a gas station, that they will need to search for a restaurant, etc. Giving yourselves a little extra cushion in a new place can help ensure that you won’t be late for anything event related.

6. Be Understanding and Be Creative

Since you and your staff will be in a new location, possibly using different vendors and different equipment, and sleeping in a hotel, be sure to keep an open mind and be understanding with your crew. People WILL have questions, and that’s not a bad thing. Use this new situation to work with your crew under different circumstances and use the new venue and location to exercise your creativity and try things that you’re unable to try under usual circumstances.

About Matt Walker

Matt has been involved in marketing and event management for the better part of the last decade, planning concerts and comedy shows of national and local scale, tour managing various brands on national tours, coordinating VIP experiential marketing, and developing marketing plans for entertainment and technology companies.

The Event Planner’s Dress Code

In an industry like event management, relationships with clients vary tremendously from hugely formal/businesslike to far out casual or anything in-between.

Though, from an outsider’s perspective, event planning agencies put out a casual image, a formal attire is best suited for most of the corporate events – which comprise of an official business environment.

Here comes the need for the on-site event team to be dressed appropriately for the event – a small but important detail that often gets overlooked.

Your event team can follow a particular dress code, which looks sharp yet advertises your own brand in a tasteful way. However, professional does not always mean monotonous or stodgy; it’s fine to allow a bit of personal interests to mix with professionalism.

The members in your event team should be dressed in a monochrome, so they have the right mix of being visible to the client or guests when required; and to avoid standing out too much in the crowd. Generally, black is an industry standard – feminine tailored cuts for women are preferred and they  can have the company’s logo on them.

You can get as creative as you like with the style of these staff dresses – as long as your event team finds them comfortable, and they look presentable.  These details go a long way in establishing a brand recall with your clients and attendees.

Non-Traditional Event Venues

About the Author:

The fun loving, energetic Marketing Manager from Kansas City, MO, Kaitlin is the one who makes sure the office is always running smoothly.

When picking a venue for your event you have two main categories to choose from. You could go for a traditional venue or you could find a unique non-traditional event venue.

Picking a traditional venue is easy. If you do things the traditional way  you could pick a hotel ballroom, a resort, convention center, or banquet hall. These venues are reliable and have been used time and time. They are tried and true. However, they are a bit boring and you can bet your guest will not remember the venue after the night. Events are becoming more and more of an immersive experience planners and event professionals alike are turning to non-traditional venues to find that extra wow factor.

So what is a non-traditional event venue? Non-traditional event venues are places that are generally not created for events as their main purpose. There are many types of non-traditional venues for your event. Two categories come to mind when thinking about non-traditional event venues; architectural spaces, experiential venues. We will break down the two categories in the following paragraphs.

The first type of non-traditional event venue are architectural spaces. These are interesting architectural spaces such as a warehouse, an airplane hangar, a rooftop, or train station. Below is a photo from an event where a manufacturing warehouse was transformed into a venue.

The second type of non-traditional event venue are experiential venues. These types of venues offer some sort of attraction that people would normally go visit whether there was an event or not. Zoos, botanical gardens, museums, and art galleries fall under this category.

When deciding if a non-traditional event venue is right for you, ask yourself “Will this add to my event cause or take away from it?” If you are planning a gala to raise help for animals, using a non-traditional event venue like a zoo may be perfect for your event. It will add a lot to the theme and create a fun and immersive experience for your guests.

However, there are a few things to keep in mind when choosing a non-traditional event venue as they do present a unique set of challenges when planning. Because non-traditional venues are not typically only event venues and used for other purposes during the day, they are likely to not have as much in-house options as a traditional venue would. You will more than likely need to find your own caterer, furniture rentals and more. However, this is not necessarily a bad thing and can help you create a truly unique and one of a kind event. Below are a few things to consider when looking at non-traditional event venues:

Food and Drink

While almost all traditional venues come with options for catering and beverages, it is not the case for non-traditional venues. Some non-traditional event venues may give you a list of preferred caterers but almost all will allow  you to choose your favorite to bring in. Often a non-traditional venue will also allow you to bring in your own bartenders and alcohol which can save you huge amounts of money at your event.

Event Rentals

Often traditional event venues will provide your events with tables, chairs, power and sometimes even linens necessary to make your event a success. This is not always the case with non-traditional event venues. When seeking out a non-traditional event venue be sure to see what is included in your venue rental. You may need to rent out chairs, tables, and more from an event rental company. If you are having your event somewhere like a parking lot or an airplane hangar you should also check on what the power limitations are. In non-traditional venues you are more likely to need to bring in a generator as your power supply.

Safety

Another important factor to consider when choosing a non-traditional event venue is the safety of your guests. While safety should always be an important factor when planning events, it will need special attention when choosing a non-traditional event venue. These venues are often they are not designed for events and do not have on staff event security. Be sure to check with the venue to see if you need to hire outside security before your event.

Now you have a great idea of how to start seeking out and looking for your perfect non-traditional event venue. Non-traditional event venues may be a little bit more work while planning but they pay off is definitely worth it. If the planning is too much hire an event planner to help you through the process. If you do go with a non-traditional event venue your event will be extremely memorable. You will be rewarded greatly for thinking outside the box and choosing a unique and fun venue!

 

The Importance of Distributing a Pre-Event Memo

Planning an event for your brand can be a daunting task, something that requires a lot of concentration. There are many last minute challenges that need to be met. Clear communication, and collaboration between the event manager and the client can help overcome this . The best way is to develop and distribute a Pre-Event Memo.

While managing events, details with regard to the event requirements and the client’s objectives should always be first on your minds. However, most times, there is a certain level of disconnect between your own team and the people the client assigns from his team to work on the event. This is the main reason that a Pre-Event Memo absolutely needs to be a part of event plans.

This memo carries all the detailed information pertaining to the general functionality and logistics involved in planning an event. This would act as a ready reckon-er for all the information everyone (working on the event) would need, with specific responsibilities assigned to each person, and all other relevant information regarding the event flow.

Some straightforward, yet most necessary details are covered within this memo, are –

1) Event date, time and location.

2) Key phone numbers and email addresses

3) Venue floor-plan

4) Equipment element list

5) Drawing of setup floor-plan with sketch-up images displaying exact placement of stage.

6) List of panels (along with sizes), for company branding at the event

7) Information on speakers and general event flow.

8) List of responsibilities given to each individual working on the event.

9) List of Invitees

10) Timings of conducting dry-runs.

The aim of this Memo is to provide everyone involved, with a hands-on knowledge of virtually ANYTHING pertaining to the event. It is important, however, that this memo be distributed at least a week before the event, to allow suggestions and minor changes to take place without any hiccups.

This allows for a healthy client-event manager interaction, and helps build confidence among the people associated with the event; it encourages management authority to make last minute changes to the event flow (if required) without hesitation.

In conclusion, there is much emphasis riding on an event as a catalyst that represents a brand, and enhances the brand’s image. There is always a desire to employ every tool available to make the event a remarkable and memorable one, and the pre-event memo helps to achieve this in a highly professional and sophisticated way. It inspires all involved, and paves the way for events to be conducted with the highest standards of quality and organization.