Tag Archives: event coordinator

5 Annoying Things People Do At Events

5 Annoying Things People Do At Events

Some arrive late. Some RSVP after the event is almost over. Some do not follow the pre-event info circulated by you and ask questions that are already answered.

It’s safe to say that, as event planners, we’ve seen our share of pet peeves that attendees indulge in, at events. Here’s a list of what really grinds our gears:

1. Not Adhering to Timelines:

It’s just plain rude and inconsiderate for an event guest to show up late. These are the people you see making their way in through the crowd awkwardly and excusing themselves. There are also a few who decide selectively to attend only one segment of the entire event and rush to the eating area as soon as their ‘favorite part’ is done. The worst of this kind are the no-shows who RSVP ‘yes’ but decide against it at the last minute.

2. Constant Phone Calls:

Not only do they keep their phones on loud, but also find it extremely okay to attend each and every call that they receive. It’s a blessing if they move out of the scene to chat, or you will be privy to some personal conversations on loud mode.

3. Coming to the Console for Requests:

The console is NOT a cellphone charging station. Some clients also get on the wrong side of the console (pun intended) by changing the agenda or order of presentations, leaving event planners baffled.

4. Leaving  Belongings at Registration:

Just because lanyards with your names are handed out at registration when you enter, it’s not okay to leave behind your belongings and ask event staff to keep an eye on them while you network/eat/take a washroom break and so on.

5. Irresponsible Drinking:

Everybody loves an open bar, but it’s great if event guests can keep themselves at an average pace and save some embarrassing moments for themselves and the others around.

These are a few less than impressive experiences that make event planners pull their hair out. Avoid these and you’ll be a regular invitee who’ll be remembered for the right reasons.

 

Event Venues - Small or Big?

Event Venues – Small or Big?

There’s something about a colossal event space – that makes room for all the elements of an event set up AND holds maximum attendees, while allowing networking to happen. However, in the event management industry, change is the only constant. The new trend for event venues is to go small.

Hotels and convention centers are being encouraged to host conferences and gatherings in smaller meeting spaces – which makes them more personal, casual and engaging.

Courtesy: Bizbash
Courtesy: Bizbash

Even if the event itself demands a larger space to support its agenda, say a corporate launch for example, some methods can be incorporated in the seating plan to make spaces that help attendees feel comfortable to connect, network and brainstorm.

Courtesy: Bizbash

For this purpose, event planners can go ahead with lounge seating as alternatives to typical chairs.  The ultimate networking space would be smaller tables with may be a few bean bags or comfortable chairs – with the perfect combination of secure, reliable Wi Fi and charging kiosks for all mobile devices. This is a good way to break free from traditional meeting areas.

Courtesy: Bizbash

From small to large, every request is an opportunity for a venue to improve its operations and expand its business.

 

Coordinating Guest Travel To Your Event

Coordinating Guest Travel To Your Event

Whether you’re planning a wedding or you’re a corporate event planner, you know that the logistics can make or break an event. If the guests’ memories of the event are more about driving around in circles, lost, searching for the venue than they are about the fun they had there, that’s not a good thing. One of the best things you can do as you plan either a social or corporate event is to coordinate your guests’ transportation. Even if the attendees are largely local, coordinating charter bus transportation can eliminate the anxiety of finding the venue, the potential for drinking and driving, and avoid having to ensure space for lots of cars to be parked.

 As well, if you’re expecting attendees from out of town, a shuttle bus rental to transport them back and forth to airports and hotels can not only alleviate their stress, but your own, too, because you can ensure that they will arrive safely and on time. However, not all bus charter companies are created equal; here are some tips for choosing a charter bus company that will be reliable and suit your needs:

 1.     Safety first: Certainly, the first priority for choosing a charter bus rental company is finding one with a reputation for taking safety seriously. The website allows you check safety ratings of motor carrier companies; if you’re evaluating a motor carrier, look it up by name  and number on the site to discover its safety rating.

 2.     Check insurance: Bus charter companies have different regulations to follow based on whether they travel within states or over state lines. While you might think that’s their problem and not yours, it could be a problem for you if the bus charter company doesn’t have the proper insurance; it could get fined or impounded, which would leave you high and dry at the time of your event.

 3.     Get references or read testimonials: Some charter bus companies list testimonials on their websites, but it’s hard to know whether they are legitimate. When contracting with a charter bus company, it’s a good idea to ask the representative if s/he can provide three references, i.e. customers who can attest to good service that the company provided. Sometimes, companies are hesitant to do this, and it may not be because they’re afraid of what the customer would say;  it could be that they have confidentiality agreements or other reasons why they’re not comfortable approaching former clients. However, if that’s the case, you can simply Google the name of the company with the search term “reviews” and you’ll likely find a host of reviews that will give you an idea as to whether the company is reputable. Every business is sure to have a few negative reviews, so don’t just read one or two. Check them out and look for a pattern of overall satisfaction or dissatisfaction before you make a decision.

 4.     Contingency plans: Ask the bus rental company how it handles unforeseen circumstances, like a bus breaking down en route to an event or a driver getting sick. What is their backup plan? You don’t necessarily need to know every detail about how they handle a Plan A and Plan B for each event because it’s their business to coordinate the logistics, but you should feel confident that the company has systems in place in order to accommodate a situation that could be out of the ordinary. Whatever the procedure is, you want to be assured that if they need to substitute a bus or driver, it won’t impact your guests’ safety or comfort, or their arrival at their destinations on time. Inquire as to whether the charter bus rental company has a 24-hour number staffed by real people (i.e. not voice mail) that you can call in case of emergency.

 5.     Driver screening: Ask what qualifications the driver must have. Again, safety is important, and this is part of that. Find out if the company’s drivers undergo drug screens, criminal background checks, driving record checks and other rigorous application processes. Especially if your event involves transporting children, you need to know that drivers have been screened appropriately. The driver must have a valid Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) with a passenger endorsement printed on the document. CDLs can be issued once a driver has demonstrated ability based on on-road and knowledge examinations. If necessary, inquire as to whether the company has bilingual drivers.

 6.     Cost! Of course you’re going to compare pricing of various bus charter companies before you make a decision. But, cheapest is not necessarily best. Many charter bus rental companies offer a variety of bus rental options so that you can choose specific vehicle amenities that are ideal for your group. Some shuttle vans, charter buses or minibuses have features like on-board restrooms, DVD players and wifi, so you should discuss with your representative specifically what would best meet your guests’ needs and what the involved fees would be.

These are all just starting points; the main aspect to scheduling a shuttle van or charter bus for your event is making sure that you have enough capacity to accommodate the number of guests you’re expecting and that the bus rental company is able to provide service to the venues where your event is being hosted. Providing transportation might be the single biggest perk you can give your event guests; we’ve all been in situations where we’ve had to be somewhere on time, but we’ve struggled with maps and parking, or we’re simply too tired to drive home afterwards. Eliminate all of that hassle — it will be worth it!

Source: metropolitanshuttle.com

Event Debriefs - The sooner, the better

Event Debriefs – The Sooner, the Better

All those weeks of planning. All those efforts and details coming together to form an extra ordinary event. The event is over, yet there are several areas where improvement was needed.

As an event planner, your job is to lead a thought-provoking discussion by asking your event team, questions in a pre-planned sequence. This event debrief will allow all of you to describe what happened during the entire event, what was accomplished, what needs were met and what areas could be worked on, for better results.

The sooner this debrief is conducted, the better; as the event experience is still fresh in the minds of everyone who worked on it. This helps because the full-scale debrief that you had planned to do in office weeks later will become easier.

Let your team know in advance that a fast, crisp discussion will be held onsite as soon as the event wraps up.  Have someone take notes of everything discussed and let them know that these points will be revisited later in greater detail for the main debrief session coming up.

At the end of this session, you should have some valuable inputs from your team which you can incorporate into your next event planning process.

 

 

Post-Event Feedback

Post Event Feedback

As an event planner, you might have used your best resources and ideas to execute a smooth event for your client.  But did it live up to your client’s expectations? Were the sound and lights favorable? Was the catering decent?

Learn about the needs and expectations of your target market to improve your future business and marketing strategies through curated post-event surveys.  Post-event surveys often provide the most meaningful feedback in knowing if your efforts were successful from the attendees’ perspective.

To ensure the highest participation rate, send your post-event survey to attendees as soon as the event has ended, while their experience is fresh in their minds. The most important information collected from post-event surveys is whether attendees found value in the event, whether it was worth their investment of time and resources, and whether they would participate in the event again.

Online surveys are the most useful – you can get the responses faster than collecting them manually and collate data to help further your research.  When creating the survey, keep it short — under 10 questions is best — and only use one or two open response answers. People will be more likely to answer the survey if it contains choices instead of requiring them to write answers to everything.

Below are samples of questions to ask in your next post-event survey:

  • How would you rate the overall outcome of this event?
  • How would you rate the competence of the event staff?
  • Do such events help in increasing visibility for the company?
  • Was there a networking opportunity for attendees?
  • What could the event organizers have done differently?
  • Compared to other similar events you have attended, how does this event compare?
  • Can the information you gathered from this session be applied to your business?

Collecting feedback from your attendees is the best way to make your events better and better each time. You want to keep your current audience and make it grow. Use the feedback to see what works and what doesn’t work and plan accordingly. You can go from being a good event planner to a great one simply by listening to the people who experience your events first-hand.

 

Event Seating

Event Seating

The seating arrangement at your event is a deciding factor in making or breaking the event. The venue for any event is chosen after examining the layout and the space available.  However, venue seating charts are often deceiving and are not good measures of how many people can be placed or seated comfortably. Before event planners can pack in as many attendees as the venue can allow, it must be determined what kind of seating will be used and in what configuration.

The dynamics, networking and participation at the event depends on seating. Depending on the objectives of the meeting or the event, assigned seats or tables can be beneficial.

Deciding the type of seating at events depends on  some factors like – where the food will be served, if the attendees will be taking notes or using laptops during the sessions, if there will be an award ceremony that requires people to walk up to the stage, the shape and size of the stage and the size of the audience.

The different types of seating generally used are:

Theater style seating

Classroom style seating

Round table/cluster seating

To ensure that you are selecting the best seating solution for your event, ask yourself what is needed and what is available. What you need will be determined by the size of the audience and the itinerary of the sessions held during the event. Whether you are planning an award show or a training seminar, specific furniture and configurations will be more functional than others.