Tag Archives: conferences

What event licenses are required for your next company event ?

People often ask me, what is the most important aspect when you organize an event for your client  ? What do we as clients need to account for?  Well, for us, there has always been one response, Event Licenses.

Before any event takes place, there are a set of licenses which one requires to acquire to ensure a smooth flowing event.  Most hotels provide clients the list of licenses ,which they would require to be submitted to them 24 hours before the event begins . There may be slight differences in the list provided, depending on the type of event.

Let us hypothetically consider an event which has everything in it, A company conference without any sponsors or paid attendees. A closed door invitee only event. It is a full day conference with Live Entertainment and a DJ Party to follow.

The list of licenses you would require are :

  • Rangbhoomi License
  • No objection Certificate from the Additional Collectors office
  • No Objection Certificate from the Local Police Station
  • No Objection Certificate from the Traffic Police Department
  • No Objection Certificate from the Fire Brigade
  • Police Commissioners Note

The above licenses come as a cluster of licenses common for any event.

For the DJ at your event, you require :

  • Phonographic Performance Ltd License : For any music apart from music by Yashraj Films.
  • Novex : This license is acquired for any music used at the event which is by Yashraj Films.

If you are having any Live Performance at your event, then you require :

  • IPRS : It stands for Indian Performing Rights Society Ltd. It is issued for any Live Entertainment you plan to have at your event.

Other Licenses Required :

  • Liquor License
  • Public Works Department License : You need to get this when you have a generator at your event.
  • Foreign Artist Permission : Whenever you have people from another nationality performing at your event, you require to get a license for that separately.

Documents you will require to get these licenses :

  • Floor Plan from the venue
  • No Objection Cerificate from the Venue
  • Letter of Application to different licensing departments on your company’s letter head along with an affidavit on a stamp paper.
  • Visa and contract copy between the artists and employee company if you have any foreign artists performing. It would be preferable in this case to get artists on a business visa and not an employment visa.

More often than not, it is advisable to ask the hotel what licenses they would require for the event and accordingly proceed.

So given above are the list of licenses required for your event,  in-case you have sponsors and paid attendees at your event, there is the Entertainment Tax directorate which comes in factoring in details on a subjective event to event basis.

3 Things we relate to from The Pawn Stars

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The Pawn Stars is a reality TV Show about a family run gold and silver Pawn store in Las Vegas, Nevada. The show is centered around the Harrison family, who own the store and how they go about running the business successfully on a day to day basis.

While most part of the show concentrates on American History and everything American , right from Antiques to Guns and rings, there are 3 aspects which we can think of, which can be considered relatable to most businesses and can make you take a step back and think whether you have faced those situations before.

  • No Fear 

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In today’s day and age, businesses are the toughest negotiators while closing a deal. A lot of this is contributed by the amount of existent competition within your industry ,making it harder to get the client to buy at the price you are quoting and one invariably drops their price just to close the sale.

What you notice in Pawn stars, if you have watched the show, is that they never fear the loss of the deal. They have a maximum bid which they offer, beyond which they refuse to go. What they very subtly bring to the fore is one of the oldest principles every sales person learns of, NEVER FEAR THE LOSS OF SALE.

We at Pegasus, try to incorporate this principle always, not because we are rigid and we cant negotiate, it would be stupid to not leave room for negotiation, but we set a ceiling for ourselves, we never drop below a certain standard of quality we set, the standard that clients reap maximum reward out of, even if the client asks us to. Which is when we say NO.

As they always say, “ Quality comes at a price”.

  • Knowing your Buyer/Seller as much as your product/service

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It is obvious, all sales people usually have all the knowledge about their product, the usual mantra being we are the best and we top all rankings etc etc. Many a times, they have little or no idea about how the industry of the person they are meeting operates. This can be a tremendous disadvantage to the seller, because that does not allow them to link their product to the need of the client, which just ends up making it a one sided pitch.

Any product which comes to the shop in Pawn Stars, the owners seem to have enough knowledge about it to negotiate backed by logic, which more often than not allows them to close the deal and maximise their margins.

We have always said, no two events for us are the same. Once we receive the initial brief about the event, we spend as much time on researching what industry the client is from in order to suggest options which would allow the client to derive maximum benefit from the event.

Every event has its constants and variables, we treat even the constants as variable until we are absolutely sure that the event would require it.

  • Always trust the experts :

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Many a times it so happens, in the eagerness to close the deal, people tend to over promise and under deliver. This happens because they tend to commit to things without knowing and understanding what goes into making those things happen.

On the show, they make it evident. Even if they have the slightest doubt, they have a panel of experts they consult for more information. And then, they trust that information completely.

In incorporating that within our business, our expert being our better sense of judgement, we have crafted ourselves the reputation of only taking on what we are sure of delivering and being absolutely vocal about something we are not sure of. The slightest doubt, makes us create contingencies, making delivering on our promises a certainty with all our clients.

5 ways how you can contribute towards making your event successful!

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As a client, you have expectations. You want to organize a fantastic event for your clients in a cost effective manner, and generate maximum return on investment out of doing so.

You want to be on top of your game, and you want to create a long lasting impression which your audience will remember until the next event you organize.

You want them to expect better and more when they attend your company’s next event.

You have 2 options here :

  • Try to become an event manager and be the jack of all trades, where you try to do everything and end up giving little attention to what will actually give you a return on your investment.

OR

  • You hand over the event execution to companies such as our’s, who do this everyday, so that you can concentrate on furthering relations with your attendees and ensuring your guests feel welcome out of attending the event.

Our guess and our hope is, that you want to be number 2. Unfortunately, from our experience, it is close to impossible for you as a client to completely let go, which is absolutely normal for any person.

Before you get into a conundrum and start wondering, how then will you manage both ,Read further for how you can help to ensure a smooth flowing event and at the same time have enough time to concentrate on your business.

  • Trust your event planner :

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This we list down first, because it is that critical to ensure a successful event. We always encourage our clients to be absolutely transparent and candid about what they expect. If you were to hold back any information related to the work we do, it can have adverse effects on the over all functioning of the event.

Your event is important to us, as it is to you and us seeing it from your perspective is extremely important to ensure flawless execution.

  • Be the single point of Contact :

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With most companies, more often than not, more than one person is assigned the responsibility of seeing the event through.

What is most recommended by us, is for us to have one point of contact in order to ensure one clear channel of communication and to avoid miscommunication.

This practice gives your event an organized approval structure and makes all event processes quicker and more efficient.

  • Follow Timelines :

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This is one of the most important aspects. Almost all event companies will give you a sheet, which will list down when specific things such as Podium presentations, attendee lists, approvals on event graphics and agenda are required latest by.

The reason for this is obviously to back up on all the finer details involved within the event. The event only gets as good as what the presenters and audience make it, Hence always meet those deadlines.

  • Hierarchy:

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This is a subtle reference to point no 2. While we expect a single point of contact at the clients company, it is critical, especially during the event that only the event planner who you have been dealing with be handed out instructions.

On the day of the event, you will see many event staff doing many different things, all directed by one person. If you were to hand them a set of instructions apart from what they are doing it would upset the wagon wheel completely, breaking a sprocket in the entire event machinery. Always ask the event director on site to assign someone for something you require.

To give you an example : If 2 hosts are assigned the responsibility of registration, and you ask them to escort a VVIP to their seat, they may do so, but that makes you vulnerable to losing the visiting cards collected at the registration desk and also leaves your registration desk unattended.

  • On the day, leave it to the experts:

This pretty much, is a compilation of all the above points put together. The reason to mention this though, is because most clients don’t realize that this is what your event planner prepared for since they first received the brief.

What we encourage our clients to do is, after the dry run is completed to leave the console and logistics in our capable hands and you enjoy the event, with your point of concentration being your attendees and speakers.

Bright Ideas For Better Event Signage

Signage is one of those details that’s easy to do on autopilot, especially if you’re planning a recurring event. Here are some creative, out-of-the-box ideas for making your logo, event information, and displays stand out.

This article has been borrowed from Bizbash, written by Martha  C White.

1. Turn unlikely elements into signage. For a retail client’s 3,500-attendee incentive trip, Katie Fraser, U.S.A. general manager for event management agency Cievents in New York, printed sponsors’ names on helium-filled Zygote balls that change color when touched. “The balls were used during the beginning of the conference session, while everyone was in the room, to add some energy before the session started,” she says, and the sponsors appreciated that attendees had a literal hands-on experience with their names.

2. Combine fabric and LEDs for a chameleon display. Suburban Chicago-based Moss Events built what marketing communications manager Mel Marzan calls a “color wash wall.” Fabric is stretched into a frame lined with remote-controlled LED lights that change color. The fabric diffuses the light for a subtle effect, and the planner can change the brightness or color depending on what else is taking place in the space. Make it bright and eye-popping when attendees first arrive, then dim it when the lights go down for speeches or presentations.

3. Create logos with products. “We once created a client logo using different colored apples that were mounted on an angled board as you walked into the space,” Fraser says. Other than produce, items ranging from electronics to consumer packaged goods, such as cell phones or cereal boxes, could be pressed into service the same way, she says.

4. Mix up your video feed. A wall of LED panels can deliver a great visual statement, but it’s a significant investment, so you don’t want attendees to tune it out. Since just a scroll of sponsor or donor names can get monotonous, mix it up with a montage of photographs that tie into the group or event’s theme, quotes from the group’s leaders or beneficiaries, or other visually stimulating imagery, suggests Merryl Brown, president of Santa Barbara-based Merryl Brown Events. “We’re constantly disseminating information via the LED walls,” she says. She also uses the LED wall to provide real-time updates on time-sensitive topics like upcoming awards and silent auction schedules.

5. Use themed “human arrows” to guide attendees. Instead of having staff members or arrows on easels pointing the way to a nearby off-site venue, Dani-Lee Landa, director of sales for destination management company 360 Destination Group in Los Angeles, had acrobats, jugglers, and stilt walkers holding arrows to direct attendees from the Loews Santa Monica to the pier for a financial group’s circus-theme event last year.

6. Build fabric walls. Print and layer fabric panels for a visually arresting effect, Marzan suggests. For a Symantec trade show exhibit booth, Moss Events created illuminated fabric walls that were printed with the company name to construct the booth’s sides. Inside, curved, semi-sheer fabric “walls” offered buyers a more private space to meet with sales reps without cutting off light or sight lines. “Both can be see-through meshes, or the back one can be solid, and you get different effects with each,” he says.

7. Make a logo come to life by adding animation. For the 50th anniversary gala of the Scholarship Foundation of Santa Barbara two years ago, Brown wanted to create movement but was working within a budget that ruled out an LED wall. Instead, she designed an animation of the group’s logo—an open book—that morphed into flying birds. She hung flat draping all the way around the room and used moving projectors to display the animation, pausing the visuals during speeches and presentations.

Why You Need to Treat Your Staff as Well as Your Attendees

This post has been written by Kristi Sanders from Event Planning, a blog by Cvent.

There’s a triple bottomline to sustainability: people, planet, profits. The last two are pretty clear, but how are you supposed to treat people sustainably?

The answer is simple: Like human beings.

How often have you served a three-course banquet to your event attendees while serving your staff sandwiches? For that matter, how often do you enjoy a full meal while you’re onsite? That’s not sustainable.

People have limits beyond which they burn out and cease to be productive. If you want your employees to give you 100 percent, you can’t demand they always be “on.” You need to give them sufficient breaks to recharge, adequate nutrition on-site and enough hours “off the clock” that they can sleep more than 5 hours a night.

In order to do that, you need to stop yourself from:

  • Sending emails after hours and on weekends. What’s work-related needs to be limited to work hours.
  • Skimping on paying your staff the same courtesies you pay your clients and attendees. Do they have special dietary requirements? Do they have physical restrictions? Be as considerate in planning your staff meals and outings as you are when organizing your conferences.
  • Requiring employees to work while on vacation.
  • Denying yourself full meals, vacation time, and hours “off the clock.” Otherwise you risk falling into the “superman/superwoman” trap. If you don’t take care of yourself, you can’t take care of others. And it’s no one else’s fault if you’re a workaholic. People need to have a life outside, too.

At the conclusion of every program, you and your staff need to take a break. Otherwise, your creative energy and enthusiasm will start to dry up.

Don’t limit consideration only to your staff, either. Speakers, exhibitors, vendors, and sponsors aren’t just commodities, they’re people, too. Avoid creating a conference “class system” where people who are paying money to be onsite with you are excluded from all the perks and basic human necessities (like food and water on an expo trade floor) that other classes of attendees get. If you do, you can be certain that they eventually will fail to see the ROI of investing in your future events.

5 Annoying Things People Do At Events

Some arrive late. Some RSVP after the event is almost over. Some do not follow the pre-event info circulated by you and ask questions that are already answered.

It’s safe to say that, as event planners, we’ve seen our share of pet peeves that attendees indulge in, at events. Here’s a list of what really grinds our gears:

1. Not Adhering to Timelines:

It’s just plain rude and inconsiderate for an event guest to show up late. These are the people you see making their way in through the crowd awkwardly and excusing themselves. There are also a few who decide selectively to attend only one segment of the entire event and rush to the eating area as soon as their ‘favorite part’ is done. The worst of this kind are the no-shows who RSVP ‘yes’ but decide against it at the last minute.

2. Constant Phone Calls:

Not only do they keep their phones on loud, but also find it extremely okay to attend each and every call that they receive. It’s a blessing if they move out of the scene to chat, or you will be privy to some personal conversations on loud mode.

3. Coming to the Console for Requests:

The console is NOT a cellphone charging station. Some clients also get on the wrong side of the console (pun intended) by changing the agenda or order of presentations, leaving event planners baffled.

4. Leaving  Belongings at Registration:

Just because lanyards with your names are handed out at registration when you enter, it’s not okay to leave behind your belongings and ask event staff to keep an eye on them while you network/eat/take a washroom break and so on.

5. Irresponsible Drinking:

Everybody loves an open bar, but it’s great if event guests can keep themselves at an average pace and save some embarrassing moments for themselves and the others around.

These are a few less than impressive experiences that make event planners pull their hair out. Avoid these and you’ll be a regular invitee who’ll be remembered for the right reasons.