Tag Archives: attendees

Post-Event Feedback

Post Event Feedback

As an event planner, you might have used your best resources and ideas to execute a smooth event for your client.  But did it live up to your client’s expectations? Were the sound and lights favorable? Was the catering decent?

Learn about the needs and expectations of your target market to improve your future business and marketing strategies through curated post-event surveys.  Post-event surveys often provide the most meaningful feedback in knowing if your efforts were successful from the attendees’ perspective.

To ensure the highest participation rate, send your post-event survey to attendees as soon as the event has ended, while their experience is fresh in their minds. The most important information collected from post-event surveys is whether attendees found value in the event, whether it was worth their investment of time and resources, and whether they would participate in the event again.

Online surveys are the most useful – you can get the responses faster than collecting them manually and collate data to help further your research.  When creating the survey, keep it short — under 10 questions is best — and only use one or two open response answers. People will be more likely to answer the survey if it contains choices instead of requiring them to write answers to everything.

Below are samples of questions to ask in your next post-event survey:

  • How would you rate the overall outcome of this event?
  • How would you rate the competence of the event staff?
  • Do such events help in increasing visibility for the company?
  • Was there a networking opportunity for attendees?
  • What could the event organizers have done differently?
  • Compared to other similar events you have attended, how does this event compare?
  • Can the information you gathered from this session be applied to your business?

Collecting feedback from your attendees is the best way to make your events better and better each time. You want to keep your current audience and make it grow. Use the feedback to see what works and what doesn’t work and plan accordingly. You can go from being a good event planner to a great one simply by listening to the people who experience your events first-hand.

 

Unplug Your Event

Unplug Your Event

With people being inseparable from social media, it’s safe to say that technology has taken over our lives. When it comes to events, the more shares/photos/tweets you get, the better right? Wrong. Although event planners find it extremely important to promote their work through all platforms available, they must give a thought about the actual focus and attention that their event gets from their attendees.

Phones, Ipads, tablets and all other devices pose as interruptions during an event – with people feeling the constant need to update photos or tweet about their event experience. There is a fine line between your guests advocating your seminar or conference; and being digital zombies in front of their screens without having a definite understanding of what exactly is going on. When you discourage devices from your event, you encourage your guests to look up and drink in their surroundings.

When you want hundred percent attention from the crowd to a particular time in the entire event – a product launch for instance, ask them in advance to keep their gadgets aside for that moment. Setting aside a special booth like a charging station, might actually help. Asking people to tune out emails or messages from their contacts is a huge factor; respect their need to catch up with their updates throughout the event. They might have to check in with an employee or make some personal calls, and you wouldn’t want to hinder that. This in turn allows them to understand why you need their undivided attention.

The first thing that people resort to when they get bored is turn to their phones. Try making your unplugged event fun by rewarding your attendees – make the overall experience more engaging and lively so they genuinely feel the need to concentrate and remain disconnected from all that tech!

The Event Planner's Dress Code

The Event Planner’s Dress Code

In an industry like event management, relationships with clients vary tremendously from hugely formal/businesslike to far out casual or anything in-between.

Though, from an outsider’s perspective, event planning agencies put out a casual image, a formal attire is best suited for most of the corporate events – which comprise of an official business environment.

Here comes the need for the on-site event team to be dressed appropriately for the event – a small but important detail that often gets overlooked.

Your event team can follow a particular dress code, which looks sharp yet advertises your own brand in a tasteful way. However, professional does not always mean monotonous or stodgy; it’s fine to allow a bit of personal interests to mix with professionalism.

The members in your event team should be dressed in a monochrome, so they have the right mix of being visible to the client or guests when required; and to avoid standing out too much in the crowd. Generally, black is an industry standard – feminine tailored cuts for women are preferred and they  can have the company’s logo on them.

You can get as creative as you like with the style of these staff dresses – as long as your event team finds them comfortable, and they look presentable.  These details go a long way in establishing a brand recall with your clients and attendees.

Non-Traditional Event Venues

Non-Traditional Event Venues

About the Author:

The fun loving, energetic Marketing Manager from Kansas City, MO, Kaitlin is the one who makes sure the office is always running smoothly.

When picking a venue for your event you have two main categories to choose from. You could go for a traditional venue or you could find a unique non-traditional event venue.

Picking a traditional venue is easy. If you do things the traditional way  you could pick a hotel ballroom, a resort, convention center, or banquet hall. These venues are reliable and have been used time and time. They are tried and true. However, they are a bit boring and you can bet your guest will not remember the venue after the night. Events are becoming more and more of an immersive experience planners and event professionals alike are turning to non-traditional venues to find that extra wow factor.

So what is a non-traditional event venue? Non-traditional event venues are places that are generally not created for events as their main purpose. There are many types of non-traditional venues for your event. Two categories come to mind when thinking about non-traditional event venues; architectural spaces, experiential venues. We will break down the two categories in the following paragraphs.

The first type of non-traditional event venue are architectural spaces. These are interesting architectural spaces such as a warehouse, an airplane hangar, a rooftop, or train station. Below is a photo from an event where a manufacturing warehouse was transformed into a venue.

The second type of non-traditional event venue are experiential venues. These types of venues offer some sort of attraction that people would normally go visit whether there was an event or not. Zoos, botanical gardens, museums, and art galleries fall under this category.

When deciding if a non-traditional event venue is right for you, ask yourself “Will this add to my event cause or take away from it?” If you are planning a gala to raise help for animals, using a non-traditional event venue like a zoo may be perfect for your event. It will add a lot to the theme and create a fun and immersive experience for your guests.

However, there are a few things to keep in mind when choosing a non-traditional event venue as they do present a unique set of challenges when planning. Because non-traditional venues are not typically only event venues and used for other purposes during the day, they are likely to not have as much in-house options as a traditional venue would. You will more than likely need to find your own caterer, furniture rentals and more. However, this is not necessarily a bad thing and can help you create a truly unique and one of a kind event. Below are a few things to consider when looking at non-traditional event venues:

Food and Drink

While almost all traditional venues come with options for catering and beverages, it is not the case for non-traditional venues. Some non-traditional event venues may give you a list of preferred caterers but almost all will allow  you to choose your favorite to bring in. Often a non-traditional venue will also allow you to bring in your own bartenders and alcohol which can save you huge amounts of money at your event.

Event Rentals

Often traditional event venues will provide your events with tables, chairs, power and sometimes even linens necessary to make your event a success. This is not always the case with non-traditional event venues. When seeking out a non-traditional event venue be sure to see what is included in your venue rental. You may need to rent out chairs, tables, and more from an event rental company. If you are having your event somewhere like a parking lot or an airplane hangar you should also check on what the power limitations are. In non-traditional venues you are more likely to need to bring in a generator as your power supply.

Safety

Another important factor to consider when choosing a non-traditional event venue is the safety of your guests. While safety should always be an important factor when planning events, it will need special attention when choosing a non-traditional event venue. These venues are often they are not designed for events and do not have on staff event security. Be sure to check with the venue to see if you need to hire outside security before your event.

Now you have a great idea of how to start seeking out and looking for your perfect non-traditional event venue. Non-traditional event venues may be a little bit more work while planning but they pay off is definitely worth it. If the planning is too much hire an event planner to help you through the process. If you do go with a non-traditional event venue your event will be extremely memorable. You will be rewarded greatly for thinking outside the box and choosing a unique and fun venue!

 

How to Choose An Event Venue

How to Choose An Event Venue

About the author: 

Jeff Caldwell is Brand Manager of Litchfield Landscape Elements in Carrollton, GA. 

Picking the perfect place for your private or corporate event is as easy as making a simple checklist and going through it. Here are the main points you’ll need to focus on in order to make your gathering a success.

Define Your Event by Considering Your Attendees
Think about what kind of event you’re going to host and the needs of those who’ll be participating. Will people have to drive long distances or fly into town to attend? Is your event going to span more than one day? The answers to these questions can help you decide whether you should select a venue that’s close to lodgings or dining establishments.

Other important considerations include timing and overall duration. Your guests are certain to become hungry and tired after a while, especially if they have to do a lot of walking or socializing. While these aren’t unmanageable problems during shorter gatherings, you may still prefer a venue that offers on-site accommodations.

Matching Amenities to Your Guests’ Needs
Once you’ve identified pertinent attendee needs, check on the amenities available at each potential location, but don’t limit yourself. If you’re unfamiliar with the area, for instance, find out about local dining, shopping and lodging options. Choosing a venue within walking distance of such conveniences can make it much easier to schedule multi-day events. When combined with outdoor shelters or local resources, like nearby parks and entertainment, a minimalistic venue can become the scene of an unforgettable gathering.

Ensuring the Location Can Support Your Schedule
Of course, you’re also responsible for the actual activities that will occur during the event. Your venue must be able to accommodate lectures, speeches, dances, banquets or anything else you need to make the overall gathering enjoyable.

So, how can you tell if your proposed location is suitable? In most cases, the easiest way to get a good feel for what you’ll be able to do with the place is to check it out in person. While two competing venues may seem to be comparable on paper, touring them yourself will make it much easier to choose something you feel comfortable planning around.

The Value of Close Inspection
You should also take advantage of your inspections by comparing each venue’s listed amenities with what you actually see. For instance, it’s not enough to simply have audio-visual equipment of uncertain quality on hand; you need to ensure that the cables, connectors and devices are current enough to meet your standards. Similarly, you should inspect critical fixtures, such as outlets and lighting.

Be certain the space can create the aesthetic effect or impression you want to promote. True, some of your attendees will be considerate enough not to blame you and your organization for the patchy wallpaper or shabby decor, but can you say the same for your international business partners? If you plan on dressing to impress, then your venue ought to do the same.

Distinguishing Price Factors
Finally, remember that venue pricing isn’t just about space rental costs. Most venues work on a contractual basis, and if you’re careless about the details, you may be confronted with additional expenses or unreasonable fees.

Be certain to ask about special rate availabilities for repeat events and investigate whether you’d pay less during other timeframes. Even if you’re dead set on a date, learning more about your options may help you gain more bargaining power and make a smarter choice for future events. Good luck planning!

Pre Event Memo

The Importance of Distributing a Pre-Event Memo

Planning an event for your brand can be a daunting task, something that requires a lot of concentration. There are many last minute challenges that need to be met. Clear communication, and collaboration between the event manager and the client can help overcome this . The best way is to develop and distribute a Pre-Event Memo.

While managing events, details with regard to the event requirements and the client’s objectives should always be first on your minds. However, most times, there is a certain level of disconnect between your own team and the people the client assigns from his team to work on the event. This is the main reason that a Pre-Event Memo absolutely needs to be a part of event plans.

This memo carries all the detailed information pertaining to the general functionality and logistics involved in planning an event. This would act as a ready reckon-er for all the information everyone (working on the event) would need, with specific responsibilities assigned to each person, and all other relevant information regarding the event flow.

Some straightforward, yet most necessary details are covered within this memo, are -

1) Event date, time and location.

2) Key phone numbers and email addresses

3) Venue floor-plan

4) Equipment element list

5) Drawing of setup floor-plan with sketch-up images displaying exact placement of stage.

6) List of panels (along with sizes), for company branding at the event

7) Information on speakers and general event flow.

8) List of responsibilities given to each individual working on the event.

9) List of Invitees

10) Timings of conducting dry-runs.

The aim of this Memo is to provide everyone involved, with a hands-on knowledge of virtually ANYTHING pertaining to the event. It is important, however, that this memo be distributed at least a week before the event, to allow suggestions and minor changes to take place without any hiccups.

This allows for a healthy client-event manager interaction, and helps build confidence among the people associated with the event; it encourages management authority to make last minute changes to the event flow (if required) without hesitation.

In conclusion, there is much emphasis riding on an event as a catalyst that represents a brand, and enhances the brand’s image. There is always a desire to employ every tool available to make the event a remarkable and memorable one, and the pre-event memo helps to achieve this in a highly professional and sophisticated way. It inspires all involved, and paves the way for events to be conducted with the highest standards of quality and organization.

 

 

10 Small Details That Ensure a Huge Impact at Your Event

10 Small Details That Ensure a Huge Impact at Your Event

Venue Floor Plan 

Design a venue floor-plan that helps provide details about all entry, exit, charging points, and access to conveniences. A copy of this floor-plan should be included within the event paraphernalia given to all attendees. These tiny details help make the event more organized and at the same time provides attendees all information regarding what they require, saving them the trouble of finding an event coordinator any time they require something.

On – Ground Team Recruit your friendliest, most knowledgeable employees to remain scattered throughout the venue so someone is always available to answer attendee questions — and make sure they stand out! For example, your employees can wear company badges attached to their shirt pockets. People will have lots of questions. Making it easy to find and identify event point persons will thrill attendees and nip frustration in the bud.  

Welcome and Survival Kit

A welcome packet that includes a map, nearby places to eat, local activities, taxi or car service contact information, and emergency phone numbers accompanied by Hand Sanitizers, Protein Bars, a mini first-aid kit, Chocolates and an Energy Drink goes a long way in terms of appreciative value and makes guests feel like royalty. Many attendees may be coming from out of town, and this would help them feel at ease navigating a new city or location.

Lounge Area

Designate an area where people can lounge around, have one-on-one discussions, check their email, and make phone calls. This should ideally be space where people can escape the conference and be free to deal with any tasks they might have at hand. Doing this will prevent attendees from leaving the event when they need a break and will help avoid the risk of them not coming back.

 

ID Tags with Lanyards and Jackets

There should be a clear distinction in the ID Cards given to different people at the event; you should differentiate between partners, sponsors, VIP,customers and company employees. It will make the attendees feel special to be part of a group, recognized for their relationship with your company, and easier to network with others who are part of their group.

Lights Control

Lighting during events has an unbelievable impact on the mood of the audience attending, the key is to always make sure the light is just right for every session taking place. For example, during a presentation the lights should be dim but at the same time bright enough for people to take notes or during a cocktail reception the lights should be ambient helping people relax. We always recommend that your clients should control all event lighting from the console and have preset combinations for every segment of a particular event.

 

Pre-Event Follow-Up

After invitations have been sent and RSVP done, it can be advisable to have a calling unit doing a round of calls to the invitees asking them if they need any help making their bookings or any help with regards to them attending. All queries should be noted and duly acted upon. This goes a long way in invitees feeling special and ensures there are minimal drop-outs.

Post Event Follow-Up

After the event, it is a good practice to have the same calling unit do a round of calls to all who attended asking for their feedback and providing them access to the presentations from the event.This helps keep in touch with customers well after the event is completed and helps keep them posted on any other initiatives you might be planning.

Social Media

Provide real-time updates on sessions and presentations from your event on available media like Facebook, Twitter and the event website. Let people sign-up with their information and access the event live on the event website as it happens, this would help reach a wider audience, and if people cancel, alert them of the opening. Also generating hype of the event on all available media before the event happens would help reach a wider audience. Concentrated email marketing campaigns to a broad audience can play a big part.

Effective Registration Process

Registration is a thorn in everyone’s side — attendees and conference organizers. Having a minimum of two people at the registration desk helps carry out registrations with ease. One person ticks out the persons name from the list, the second person hands over the id card and collects the persons visiting card. Alternately, what we recommend to clients is to set-up an online registration portal, to help ease out the process of pre-event registration and RSVP.