Your Event Is A Recipe – Use The Right Ingredients!

The way to a man’s heart is through his stomach. The way to a client’s heart is through an event. A perfectly crafted one, at that.

Creating a flawless event experience requires the same amount of precision and skill that goes into producing a sensational recipe – one that your attendees will remember for a long time.

Adnan Morbiwala, Chief – Sales and Marketing at Pegasus, has made a quick fix of elements that you would require, to become the Masterchef of event planning:

Ingredients :

  • Venue (Vessel)
  • 20 existing clients –  which give you 80% of your business
  • 80 prospective Clients –  audience who will hear about your services from the top 20 % of your clients
  • One serving of a grand stage
  • A dash of sound, a hint of lights and a dollop of AV Equipment.
  • An agenda for networking
  • Entertainment to taste

Method :

Clean and prepare the venue.

Once ready, add the intricately designed stage, making sure all brand guidelines are followed,  along with the equipment and console.

Dry run through the agenda to make sure every thing is in top form.

Throw in your support staff with assigned duties, to marinate stage and equipment.

Let it rest for at least 60 minutes.

Add your current clients and company management who would be setting the tone as speakers, for a taste of what your brand stands for.

Give your support staff, stage & equipment and current clients, along with company management a good mix, just so that all of them have blended well.

Now you are ready to add your prospective clients. Mix well to ensure the prospective clientele combine with your stage, sound, lights, AV, branding material  and current clients. Give enough networking time for the mixture to merge and collate.

Garnish with a good choice of entertainment with cocktails and food.

Preparation time – 3 Months

Serves – 1 Company.

For us planning an event is just like cooking a great meal, all you need is a good chef.  The Pegasus team always ensures to provide you with the right ingredients which help boost sales and gain new business through what experiential communications really is – an experience. We provide your guests an experience which takes them a lot of time to digest, albeit intentionally, and one which people remember for years to come.

 

3 Things Boston Legal Has Taught Us

Adnan Morbiwala, Chief – Sales and Marketing at Pegasus Events Pvt Ltd., shares his views on how he finds similarities between one of his favorite TV series and work-life. 

A TV show called Boston Legal had me hooked and still does, every time I stumble upon an episode or a clip. The environment portrayed within the show of a successful workplace and a profitable business teamed up with brilliant acting from all the cast involved, make for great viewing.

It’s always interesting to see how one can relate the life they live to a sitcom or a movie they watch. Some aspects from this show caught my eye which I try to apply in my daily routine -

No two people in an organization are the same :

Every character in the show has their own distinct traits and no uniformity in the work they do, yet at the end of it they prove themselves to be successful at what they do, while being given the freedom to do so in their own way. Whether the organization is big or small, this applies to all companies and creates a healthy work environment. We at Pegasus have always believed in everyone having freedom to be as creative as possible, which has given us proven results over a certain period of time albeit also having some processes which highlight the end result.

Rules can be bent, not broken :

This can have 2 implications, it can be perceived as negative as well as positive. Although we stand by the fact that fair-play should always be the order of business, in any competitive industry, second place means you get nothing.

Always sticking to your guns :

Always sticking to your guns, even if that means not getting a particular account or losing some business in the long run has proven to be a great morale booster for us at Pegasus and has helped create a common fabric of belief that runs through the entire company and not just a few sections. This furthers creative thinking from everyone within the company and more proactive involvement from everyone.

This post is not to promote the show per se; but in watching the show, I picked off and learnt the above 3 things, which have indeed given me great results in improving the work I do alone and in a team.

How To Work With New Event Vendors

Successful event planners work with a large network of vendors and suppliers in the industry. These vendors can make or break your event, no matter how great your event concepts are.

As event managers, we majorly allocate our work to vendors with whom we have established good ties, over the years. Sometimes, however, the need arises to look for a new vendor – which is not an easy task.  The vendors you choose to work with must necessarily have a good reputation as you cannot afford to damage your own in the process. Your vendor network is not just a group of people you subcontract your work to – they are your team.

Here are a few thoughts from our side, on how to pick an efficient vendor in code red situations:

  •  A good way to find new vendors is to gather referrals from one of your existing vendors, clients or other planners. Do your research and talk to people who have an experience of working with them. It’s easier to trust a new person by getting assurance from someone you already know.
  • Start small – give the new vendors a small portion of the work that you need to get done and judge their capabilities according to their response time and the quality of the work. Check if they can cope with your deadlines and standards of working.
  • Compare costs with your other vendors – you might find that vendor rates differ with different factors. Some of them might provide the same services at reduced costs, but make sure that you do not compromise on the quality.
  • Visit the vendors’ work station to get a first hand understanding by seeing samples of their previous work, before you hire them.
  • Clarify payment terms with vendors and let them know about your company’s terms and conditions – whether they are rigid or flexible. Imagine promising something to your client and not being able to deliver because your vendor was a no-show.
  • You know you have found a worthy vendor when he/she has a better knowledge than you, of what you require. Make a list of all your specifics and put it together with the suggestions that they have to offer.

There are a few times you have to blindly trust new suppliers, and it does take time to add them to your existing database. But event management, being an ever-changing, dynamic industry, thrives on trials & errors every now and then, and it’ll definitely be worth it in the end.

 

 

Why You Need to Treat Your Staff as Well as Your Attendees

This post has been written by Kristi Sanders from Event Planning, a blog by Cvent.

There’s a triple bottomline to sustainability: people, planet, profits. The last two are pretty clear, but how are you supposed to treat people sustainably?

The answer is simple: Like human beings.

How often have you served a three-course banquet to your event attendees while serving your staff sandwiches? For that matter, how often do you enjoy a full meal while you’re onsite? That’s not sustainable.

People have limits beyond which they burn out and cease to be productive. If you want your employees to give you 100 percent, you can’t demand they always be “on.” You need to give them sufficient breaks to recharge, adequate nutrition on-site and enough hours “off the clock” that they can sleep more than 5 hours a night.

In order to do that, you need to stop yourself from:

  • Sending emails after hours and on weekends. What’s work-related needs to be limited to work hours.
  • Skimping on paying your staff the same courtesies you pay your clients and attendees. Do they have special dietary requirements? Do they have physical restrictions? Be as considerate in planning your staff meals and outings as you are when organizing your conferences.
  • Requiring employees to work while on vacation.
  • Denying yourself full meals, vacation time, and hours “off the clock.” Otherwise you risk falling into the “superman/superwoman” trap. If you don’t take care of yourself, you can’t take care of others. And it’s no one else’s fault if you’re a workaholic. People need to have a life outside, too.

At the conclusion of every program, you and your staff need to take a break. Otherwise, your creative energy and enthusiasm will start to dry up.

Don’t limit consideration only to your staff, either. Speakers, exhibitors, vendors, and sponsors aren’t just commodities, they’re people, too. Avoid creating a conference “class system” where people who are paying money to be onsite with you are excluded from all the perks and basic human necessities (like food and water on an expo trade floor) that other classes of attendees get. If you do, you can be certain that they eventually will fail to see the ROI of investing in your future events.

5 Annoying Things People Do At Events

Some arrive late. Some RSVP after the event is almost over. Some do not follow the pre-event info circulated by you and ask questions that are already answered.

It’s safe to say that, as event planners, we’ve seen our share of pet peeves that attendees indulge in, at events. Here’s a list of what really grinds our gears:

1. Not Adhering to Timelines:

It’s just plain rude and inconsiderate for an event guest to show up late. These are the people you see making their way in through the crowd awkwardly and excusing themselves. There are also a few who decide selectively to attend only one segment of the entire event and rush to the eating area as soon as their ‘favorite part’ is done. The worst of this kind are the no-shows who RSVP ‘yes’ but decide against it at the last minute.

2. Constant Phone Calls:

Not only do they keep their phones on loud, but also find it extremely okay to attend each and every call that they receive. It’s a blessing if they move out of the scene to chat, or you will be privy to some personal conversations on loud mode.

3. Coming to the Console for Requests:

The console is NOT a cellphone charging station. Some clients also get on the wrong side of the console (pun intended) by changing the agenda or order of presentations, leaving event planners baffled.

4. Leaving  Belongings at Registration:

Just because lanyards with your names are handed out at registration when you enter, it’s not okay to leave behind your belongings and ask event staff to keep an eye on them while you network/eat/take a washroom break and so on.

5. Irresponsible Drinking:

Everybody loves an open bar, but it’s great if event guests can keep themselves at an average pace and save some embarrassing moments for themselves and the others around.

These are a few less than impressive experiences that make event planners pull their hair out. Avoid these and you’ll be a regular invitee who’ll be remembered for the right reasons.

 

Event Venues – Small or Big?

There’s something about a colossal event space – that makes room for all the elements of an event set up AND holds maximum attendees, while allowing networking to happen. However, in the event management industry, change is the only constant. The new trend for event venues is to go small.

Hotels and convention centers are being encouraged to host conferences and gatherings in smaller meeting spaces – which makes them more personal, casual and engaging.

Courtesy: Bizbash
Courtesy: Bizbash

Even if the event itself demands a larger space to support its agenda, say a corporate launch for example, some methods can be incorporated in the seating plan to make spaces that help attendees feel comfortable to connect, network and brainstorm.

Courtesy: Bizbash

For this purpose, event planners can go ahead with lounge seating as alternatives to typical chairs.  The ultimate networking space would be smaller tables with may be a few bean bags or comfortable chairs – with the perfect combination of secure, reliable Wi Fi and charging kiosks for all mobile devices. This is a good way to break free from traditional meeting areas.

Courtesy: Bizbash

From small to large, every request is an opportunity for a venue to improve its operations and expand its business.

 

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